Assignment 8 Testing

We ran an experiment to test the ease of initial set-up of our system. In order to determine the comparative advantage of Master Controller over the built-in parental control systems, we had users set-up a child account with basic information for two consoles using both the Master Controller system and the built-in parental controls for the XBOX360 and the Playstation3. We also had the users answer a short survey.

We had 4 users total, 2 of whom tested the Master Controller system and 2 of whom tested the built-in parental control systems. We used this between-subjects design to avoid contaminating the result by providing users with extra experience with parental control systems in general and the information we wanted them to add to the account in particular.

The mean time to complete the task on the Master Controller system was 34.0 seconds.

The mean time to set up controls for the Xbox 360 system was 28.5 seconds.

The mean time to set up controls for the Playstation3 System was 34.5 seconds.

The mean combined time to set up controls using the built-in systems was 63 seconds.

Comparing the two means using a t-test with two independent samples, we discover that the times to complete the task are shorter, on average, for subjects who use the Master Controller system (x-bar = 34.0) than those who are using the built-in controls (x-bar = 63.0), according to the t-test [(t(2)=-4.46, p < .20].

Note that these measurements assume that the system is powered on and starts at the home screen. The child accounts for the game consoles must be created separately, but we thought it reasonable to assume that children would create their own accounts before parents would begin setting restrictions.

Results of the survey (Note that the users for this stage were all college-age students):

75% of survey participants reported that they played video games.

The mean number of consoles that survey participants owned was 1.

The mean number of children that the survey particpants reported they would like to have was 2.

The mean number of hours per day that the survey participants would let their children play video games was 1.5, with a range from 1 hour per day to 2 hours per day.

75% of survey participants reported that they would use parental controls to restrict their child’s video game playing.

75% of survey participants reported that they would find it helpful to be able to view their child’s playing time from a remote (non-household) location.

 

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